Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Where you can look at chemigrams this winter

Turnbull, numerical structure 2, 2012

The Hosmer Gallery is located at the Forbes Library in Northampton, Massachusetts, about a 2-hour drive west from Boston.  Very soon you'll be able to see some of Richard Turnbull's work from 2010-2012 there, in a much anticipated show running February 1 to February 28, 2013.  Am I giving it all away by saying that my favorite is the surprising, apocalyptic 'glyph studies 1'?

Turnbull, glyph studies 1, 2012
Meanwhile, down in Pennsylvania Norm Sarachek is having a show at Santa Bannon Fine Art in Bethlehem from December 7 to December 30, 2012, featuring his new 'Steel Works' series.

Sarachek, Steel Works 1, 2012



Sarachek, Steel Works 2, 2012

He follows that up with another show at the Perkins Center for the Arts in southern New Jersey which runs from February 9 to March 23, 2013, because you'll need to see more of this fine artist.

The inventor of the so-called chromoskedasic variation in chemigrams, Dominic Man-Kit Lam, recently concluded a huge show with over 100 works at the Shanghai Art Museum (China) this past October 2012 entitled 'Vision of Harmony'.  He also spoke at the event, and an inspirational video of it has been posted on YouTube.

Man-Kit Lam, from Vision of Harmony, 2012


Man-Kit Lam, from Vision of Harmony, 2012
Man-Kit Lam, installation view, Vision of Harmony, 2012

Back in New York, Eva Nikolova is exhibiting chemigrams from her new series 'Ordinary Disappearances', which offer imaginary but quite emotional Balkan landscapes from and about memory, triggered by a trip to her homeland after many years' absence.  The show is at the Grady Alexis Gallery in El Taller Latinoamericano in upper Manhattan and runs from November 26, 2012 to January 9, 2013.

Nikolova, untitled IV, 2012


Nikolova, untitled VI, 2012

A blog regular, Nolan Preece, is presenting both chemigrams and glassprints at the PUB Gallery, Wildflower Village, Reno, Nevada from November 29, 2012 to January 15, 2013.

Chemigramist Douglas Collins exhibited in the recent Alternative Processes Competition at Soho Photo in lower Manhattan from November 7 to December 1, 2012.  He will also be in the annual group show at the Center for Photographic Art in Carmel, California, from January 12 to March 1, 2013.




3 comments:

  1. Wonderful review and beautiful images, Doug. Most intriguing that all of us may be working with the Chemigram process but the work is so varied. So it is about the vision, and the process is the way we each navigate in our own artistic space.

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  2. You're right Norm, this post illustrates the divergent uses of the chemigram approach. In fact, it is good that the basic method has evolved in our hands, that it has succumbed to our individual inclinations and has matured in doing so. Because the chemigram is not an aesthetic like cubism or vorticism or what have you but an attitude and a process; it is the attitude that binds us together and gives us a reason to discuss the process. We look on aesthetics bemusedly for the most part, but we could discuss that over a drink and not become enemies, far from it. Thanks for the comment!

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  3. I saw my first Chemigrams, by R. Turnbull, in the library show in Northampton, MA, they were very beautiful; they also inspire me to give Chemigrams a try this year, I have lots of expired or expiring photo paper & chemistry to play with; I enjoy this blog very much, thank you...

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