Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Glassprints and chemigrams from the 2011 workshop

During the month of May, Manhattan Graphics is hosting an exhibit that celebrates student work from the most recent workshop in glassprints and chemigrams.  You should see it - much of it is very inspired, even unanticipated.  Each year the emphasis shifts a bit in the workshop, reflecting the makeup of the new student group as well as fresh approaches to the teaching of the material, including reworked views of

Kathleen Adams, chemigram




David Thomas, glassprint
 

what that material should be. This year saw, on the glassprint side, a loosening of old restrictions as to what a glassprint represents.  Gone are the fusty rules about carefully mimicking, in brushed ink or smudged marker, a genre scene on acetate.  No landscapes are found here, no vases of flowers on tables with hunting horns.  I used to think that was good strong medicine but it seems the patient is cured.  Instead, we found greater freedom than expected with gobos (Andrea Matura) and scrims (David Thomas), sandwich compositions (Thomas again) and paper negatives (Matura again).  In chemigrams we did some of the usual dip n' dunk, spritzing on the hydroxide and the solvent, but we also got serious about hard resists, and many students went into their toolbox for intricate iconography.  The results show.  Paul Kleinman's resist-filled composition is outstanding; Kathleen Adams' flirt with dichroic dangers is a lot of fun too.  Here's more pictures from the show.

Eva Nikolova, chemigram


Paul Kleinman, chemigram


Andrea Matura, glassprint


David Thomas, glassprint


Paul Kleinman, chemigram


David Thomas, glassprint







Andrea Matura, glassprint


Kathleen Adams, chemigram

2 comments:

  1. A whole cadre of chemigram creators! Good work Doug, Manhattan Graphics and students. Doug, tell us more about "dichroic dangers." The last image by Kathleen Adams is striking with its hazy quality and especially the three dimensional sense of near and distance. How did Kathleen create this beautiful, beautiful work? All the best, Norm Sarachek

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  2. Kathleen is from Montana so I can't speak for her, but I suspect she just layered on strips of F and D at different times in her process, mixing in a little hydroxide as well (the darker areas). The hazy effect is indeed uncanny and is not something we taught!

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